WFMW: Saying Yes For His Girls

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I’m happy to introduce you to this week’s guest poster Jennifer for my Wednesday series Yes, Works For Me! Please welcome her and be encouraged by her yes to God and continue to link up what works for you.

At desks, sinks, and fields, on this floor of wood and this one of dirt, in kitchens where water pours right down from faucets, and in mud huts where water is fetched in buckets by walking miles one way each day, I know we are seen, these girls of Yours.

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Where children laugh and where tears stream down, where husbands and wives keep trying and where marriages dissolve in pain and hope lost, You smile, and cry, too.  You nurture these hearts and You bend and wipe tears.

Pain is not something that makes you not stay.

There are the flushed, pink cheeks, robust from plenty food.  And there are the sallow, sunken frames, eyes pleading for sustenance, mercy.

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You show us these children, those girls of Yours who lift up hands–those who know You and those who don’t — and we remember how much we need You to show us how to love all these girls well–how we need You to even give us eyes to see, to give us hearts to feel, before we love, before we believe.

We are all Your girls.

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And You take this girl’s hands in Yours as You reach, reminding her sweet:  here, here is the food I bring.

You were lost until you were found.  You thought and lived like you were forgotten until I reminded you that you are not.  You wondered if anyone saw you, knew you, cared about the depths of your heart — the heart you didn’t even know was there until I showed it to you.

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Remember you are the one whose life I claimed.

With My life you live.

These are my girls, for My girls to gather up.

Gather them, My dears.  I am Yours.  I have gathered you.  Don’t stop now.

Until they are all gathered I wait, I stay.

Kristen’s brave, inspiring words in Rhinestone Jesus got me thinking about my trip to Ethiopia–and how my yes to God to jump on that plane with my husband, seven years ago, leaving behind our (then) 5, 3, and 1 year old for 21 days forever changed my heart. Our yes to that trip, years ago, prompted my husband and I, living in the midst of crazy-busy-success-driven Silicon Valley, California, to start a non-profit as the means for us to love the people God is calling us to love, in the way He’s made us to do it. Last week it was official: Gather Ministries got accredited as a 501(c)(3).

What is your yes? Who are you made to love? How are you made to love them?

Kristen reminds me, in Rhinestone Jesus,

I believe we are all called to do something, just not everything. Focusing on our one thing and doing it well to His glory is both liberating and life changing.

Saying yes to what Jesus is calling us to do is the freedom we will never know unless we trust Him more than ourselves. Come on, sister, let’s say yes to Him. What happens next, after the yes, may not be easy, but we don’t want to miss all that good He has that we will otherwise never know.

As sisters, let’s root for each other. Let’s join Kristen in encouraging each other to listen for and respond to God’s invitation to say yes.

Jennifer square new blue backgroundJennifer Camp, co-founder of Gather Ministries and author of Loop, grew up in the middle of an almond orchard in Northern California. A former high school English teacher, she loves to write, but she especially loves to encourage people to seek and live out the truth of their story, their identity in Christ.

You can find her writing at her blog, You Are My Girls, and also with her husband about the redemptive mess of marriage at their blog, Holy Entanglement.


Navigating Technology With Our Kids in a Screen-Obsessed World

My oldest daughter got her first school locker at 5th grade orientation at the new middle school.  She nervously worked her combination and adjusted the books on her white locker shelf and added a mirror on the door. I’ll never forget the day four years ago—not because it was a big deal that she was growing up. Because it was. But I remember it more because of how grown up the other kids around her seemed.

The girl next to her had fake nails, hair highlights was wearing name brand clothes head-to-toe and had was going to take notes on a tablet. And at the locker below her, a girl was texting her boyfriend on her iPhone. It felt more like a scene from high school musical than the 5th grade.

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I silently prayed I could keep my little girl little and we could navigate these adolescent years well. And we have so far.

When she asked for certain brands, we talked about budgets and saving and through the years she enjoyed a few. When she asked for a smart phone, we told her high school and thankfully, she hasn’t asked for fake nails or a boyfriend yet.

We recognized along the journey that some parents said yes sooner than we did and others said it later. And that’s okay. Because there’s not a perfect age or stage and we are all doing the best we can. I think it depends on what’s right for your family.

I’m not saying it was easy. It was just plain hard at times. I think my daughter must have asked for something we weren’t quite ready to give her a hundred times during those middle school years. We would remind her of our goal. The requests lessened in junior high.

That’s why surprising her a few days ago before she started high school with her own smart phone was a joy for all of us. She was shocked. But she was ready and the moment felt like victory for all of us.

Along with her phone we gave her this contract. It requires phone etiquette and usage rules and where and when it’s appropriate. We all signed it.

It’s just a matter of time before your child has the power of technology at their fingertips. Whether it’s a game system, a smart phone or a Kindle or a laptop, technology is more accessible than ever and it’s here to stay. Every parent reading this handles is differently.  It’s not a question of if, it’s a matter of when.

I love technology. It’s a huge part of my life and I certainly don’t want to rob my kids of the good things that it offers. But more than anything, I want them to understand the power it wields, the dangers that are a click away and make sure they are mature enough to handle it.

It’s a big subject that changes as fast as the next upgrade and it’s our job to not only monitor our kids, but to live by example.

Growing Up Social: Raising Relational Kids in a Screen-Driven World by Gary Chapman and Arlene Pellicane helped us with this decision. This summer I read (and endorsed) this important book and I can’t recommend it enough. It’s like curriculum for parents in our tech-savvy and screen-obsessed world and it released this week!

In my daughter’s cell phone contract, we asked that she wait on a Facebook account until she was older, but gave permission for an Instagram account. After a couple of days, she said, “Mom, I’m going to wait on that too. I don’t think I’m quite ready for it yet.”

And I knew we’d waited long enough. She was ready.

Today, I’m giving away two copies of Growing Up Social: Raising Relational Kids in a Screen-Driven World. Leave a comment if you’d like to win.