Unbelievable Deal: Healthy Living Bundle $1030 Value

I love sharing great deals with you. And I’m super excited about this one because it’s not only an amazing value, it could be life-changing for you and your family.

Our family has been on a journey to healthier living since my husband was diagnosed with Diabetes several years ago. It can be a confusing and challenging road to navigate. If it weren’t for resources, we’d be lost!

That’s why I love The Ultimate Healthy Living Bundle. It includes an entire healthy living library–86 ebooks plus a lot more, valued at $1030 for only $29.97 (PDF version) or $39.97 (ebook version) and it’s available today.

This is the best deal on ebooks I’ve ever seen! There are ebooks and ecourses with countless recipes, meal planning, ideas for feeding children healthier meals, help for specialized diets and so much more. Not only do we have my husband’s special diet in our house, I’ve also been working hard for the last six months to eliminate as many processed foods for my kids.

Here’s a sampling of some I can’t wait to read in the Ultimate Healthy Living Bundle:

And there’s still so much more! Not only do you get dozens and dozens of ebooks and courses, there’s also another $200 in freebies from healthy living companies that you’ll receive with your purchase.

This ultimate bundle is expected to sell out early, so get yours today. This deal ends Sept 15.

 

Here’s to healthier living for all of us!

Disclosure: Affiliate links have been included in this post.

In Honor of The Real Labor Day

A couple of years on Labor Day, I shared the hardest labor I’ve ever done: Becoming a mom!

I thought I’d share my facts again and you can do the same in the comments.

We will give each other a virtual, sweaty high-five!

How long were your labors?

Kid #1, 12 hours

Kid #2, 10 hours

Kid #3, 8 hours

How did you know you were in labor?

Kid #1, 2 weeks late, induced due to begging.

Kid #2, 1 week early, induced due to threatening

Kid #3, 7 weeks early, emergency c-section, because I like to mix it up a little.

Where did you deliver?

In the safety and security of the hospital, where most patients with OCD deliver.

Drugs?

Yes, many and all kinds.

C-section?

On my last one, after 7-8 hours of laboring without dilation, I was rushed down the hall because the baby and I weren’t doing well. I’ve never been more afraid of a nurse with a razor!

Who delivered?

Kid #1- A nice midwife who sat on the end of my bed to ‘take a looksey’ broke the end of my bed–completely off—she went on to do a great job!

Kid #2- We moved when I was 8.5 months pregnant and a very reluctant doctor I only met once, delivered my son.  When she told me I was too far along to accept as a new patient, I burst into tears and said my hubby would have to do it.  She quickly changed her policy.

Kid #3- The best OB in Texas!  I love this woman.  I’m pretty sure she saved my daughter’s life!

How about you? What are your numbers?

Did you adopt? (how long did you wait? Those hours should win you a trophy!)

 

originally posted, Sept. 1, 2008

Saying Yes. Again.

Four years ago we said yes to the improbable. The impossible.

It seems like yesterday we sat down and planned out something we would call Mercy House.

It seems like forever ago.

IMG_0643

2011

Several times over the course of the weekend, the audacity of this crazy idea would hit us. Terrell and I would pass a knowing look over our kid’s heads or he would squeeze my hand in reassurance or just whisper the name of Jesus in my ear. We waivered between extreme exhilaration and total nausea but we simply could not deny that we felt the undeniable presence of God in our conversations and the Holy Spirit leading us.

I’ll never forget sitting down with Terrell, our bills, monthly budget, and savings account figures in front of us and trying to decide how far we could take this dream before it financially ruined us if no one dreamed with us. While we knew this was a journey of faith, it seemed like a daunting task, especially since we were doing it alone.

“This could ruin us, you know,” Terrell said as we stared at our bank statements and 401k account. “I think we can do this for two years at the most.”

“We will get churches to help us and the readers of my blog. They know about Maureen and they followed my story about Africa,” I tried to reassure him. But deep down I was scared and he was too. “Let’s pray.” Again.

“God you know we are terrified. But we believe you have led us to this point. We don’t know how this is going to work but we are trusting you to show us.”

I spent hours laying awake at night during this season, trying to figure it out. I even jotted down a list of names of people I knew with money. I thought we had a good plan.

We were wrong. God had better plans,” from Rhinestone Jesus: Saying Yes to God When Sparkly, Safe Faith Is No Longer Enough

And that plan included you.

SBP_0940

Our Kenyan Director, Maureen, with her husband, Oliver, Program Director

God has done the impossible.

Saying yes has changed everything for our family. 

We are living wide awake.

This journey has been filled with big faith, big failures, big fears and an even bigger God.

And we are saying yes. Again.

After months of praying and planning, my husband, Terrell, has accepted the invitation from the Mercy House Board of Directors to become the CEO of Mercy House to help lead the vision for the organization to expand its borders beyond Kenya and empower women all over the world.

Last week, he resigned from the job he’s had the last 11 years, a corporate America job and all the benefits that go with it.

We are stepping into the unknown.

Because we know Who is already there, waiting for us.

We are excited. We are scared. (It’s a big pay cut and he will have to raise his salary).

SBP_1089

I wrote these words in my book last year:

“Do you have a dream today? Perhaps you’re wondering if it’s your dream or his dream for you? Here are some characteristics of a God-sized dream:

It will be bigger than your capability.

It will require hard labor. Even with modern-day medicine, childbirth is risky. Similarly, birthing a dream requires hard, long work. It won’t be easy.

It will look impossible. You won’t have the resources, details, or all the answers.

There will be a big gap between your yes and the reality of your dream. That space is God-sized. If we have all the answers, resources, funding, the perfect plan, it might be our dream and not his. But when we don’t know all the details or have all the answers, it gives God room to show up.

It will require great dependence on God. If it fails, he receives glory in our failure. And if it succeeds, he gets the credit. Our God-sized dreams serve two purposes: they grow the dreamer and they give God glory. Our dream starts with our small faith and ends with a Mighty Savior.”

SBP_1033

And today, we are trusting these words. Again.

A Back to School Prayer For My Children

Dear God,

School starts today. Thank you, thank you (sincere holy whisper). We both know that momma’s bag ‘o summer tricks is plum empty and hiding in the bathroom while my children argue upstairs is not going to work much longer.

School still life with copyspace on chalkboard

We’ve got brand new school supplies tucked neatly into clean backpacks. The kids each have squeaky new tennis shoes and their first day of school clothes picked out, except for my son who doesn’t care, but you know that already. Thank you for providing every bit of it.

We’ve spent the last couple of days getting ready. And ready or not, it’s time.

There are some jitters, wondering about getting the locker open on the first try, making new friends and who to sit by at lunch. And that’s just me. I know my kids are nervous too. You know I got a little emotional this week as I stepped into their world, walking the halls they will everyday. I have some worries, a few fears because I don’t like the cultural “norms” in our world – many aren’t normal at all in our family.  I am proud of the Godly choices my kids have made but with every new school year, they take a step further away from me and that’s hard for every momma.

Diptic

But you urge us not to worry.  So, instead I’m praying this over them today:

I pray you will be near them when I can’t be.

I pray if they don’t feel your presence, they will seek you and discover you’re right there with them.

I pray you will surround them with peace and comfort in every new situation.

I pray when they are pressured, you will help them stand.

I pray they find one good friend, a brother or sister in Christ because it’s hard to stand alone.

I pray that 6 AM won’t come as early this year.

I pray when they fail, they will forgive themselves and try again.

I pray you will give the school nurse an extra supply of patience and bandaids for my second grader.

I pray my kids will befriend those that are new, lonely or both.

I pray they will not sit next the child who has to throw up in the class trashcan.

I pray they will be a blessing to their teacher and not a curse.

I pray you will bless them with Godly teachers as you have in the past.

I pray they will have fun. But not too much, if you know what I mean.

I pray they will let their light shine, quietly or loudly, but in their own way.

I pray homework will be light and not become Home. Work.

I pray that you will help me to trust their choices, let them go even when it’s hard, and pull them close when they need me to the most.

I pray above all, God, that you would use their challenges, disappointments and victories to draw them closer to you this school year.

Thank you for every gift.

Amen

 

edited repost

What Seven Days on A Farm Taught My Son About Life

It was a last minute plan–to send my 12 year old son to spend a week on his grandparents farm. It was the first time for him to go alone, without the comfort (and irritation) of sisters.

Farm days in August can stretch long. But the alternative was another routine week at home, so he jumped at the chance to get away. A couple of days before, my father-in-law hurt his arm badly and was waiting on surgery. My son said “Maybe I can help out.” Which is code for I want to drive a four wheeler or kill something.

(He got to do both).

We met halfway to hand him off  in Dallas and I put the family phone we keep at home into his pocket in case he needed to reach me. But we both knew it was more for me than him.

I knew this would be a special week.

photo copy 3

Knowing my son, I knew it would be special time for his grandparents, too.

Every time I talked to him, I could hear the smile in his voice. I listened to adventures and laughed at his stories.

We only had one text conversation the whole week:

“I miss you.”

“Can’t blame you,” he replied.

“Ha. You’re so funny. What are you doing?”

“Sitting in a hayfield, playing Candy Crush, eating puffy Cheetos with Nanny,” he said.

“I think that’s what Heaven will be like: a serene hayfield, Candy Crush, Cheetos and love.”

“With Jesus.”

Oops. Yes.

photo copy 4

Here’s what seven days at the farm taught my son about life.

  1. Listen to the wiser, older people in your world. They can teach you a lot. People don’t always listen to the elderly, but they have a lot of good stuff to say. He loves to retell their stories.
  2. Hard work produces results. Food you plant, watch, grow, harvest tastes better than any you can buy. He walked the garden rows for hours, filling buckets with vine-ripened tomatoes, snapping off fresh okra and picking cucumbers. It was the best kind of work.
  3. When you don’t know what to do, find something to do. There’s always something to do on the farm. Exploring, roaming, imagining and hard work cures boredom.
  4. Slow down to appreciate the beauty around you. Sitting in a field on a hot August day, watching the wind whip and roll the grass like waves with crystal blue skies as the backdrop is hard to ignore.
  5. Helping others helps yourself. It felt good to help out, to be needed, to learn from someone older willing to teach someone younger. Helping makes you want to help more and that feels good.
  6. Time away from the people in your life makes you miss them. Every time I heard my son talk to his sisters on the phone, I smiled. It’s hard to disagree or argue when you simply miss being together.
  7. Life is better with gratitude. Since returning home, my son has referenced his grandparents dozens of times. He’s shared kitchen and gardening tips he picked up and offers new thoughts on life from their perspective.

photo copy 5

I have no doubt the week changed us all.